Democracy is vital to protecting our health and the environment. Without it, individuals are unable to make informed consumer and political choices and hold decision-makers to account. Our work on the Aarhus Convention helps individuals do just that by ensuring wide access to environmental information and the ability to participate in and challenge decisions. With these tools, citizens can change the policies and corporate practices that are harming our environment and health.
Anne Friel, Lawyer, European Union Aarhus Centre, Environmental Lawyers ClientEarth

Anne Friel

Lawyer, Environmental Democracy

Anne Friel joined ClientEarth’s Brussels office in February 2015.

Her work focuses on enforcing access to information and justice rights at EU level. Anne previously practiced EU competition, trade and public procurement law in the Brussels offices of White & Case and Philip Lee Solicitors until 2011, when she joined the European think tank, Migration Policy Group, to work on responsible public procurement.

Anne has a first class degree in Scots law from the University of Glasgow and a masters in EU law from the College of Europe in Bruges. She qualified as a solicitor in Scotland in 2008 (not currently practising as a solicitor).

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Latest from Anne Friel

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    General Court considers availability of effective judicial remedies in national courts

    The General Court dismissed an action brought by a Slovak chemicals company against an EU Regulation prohibiting the use of mercury and mercury compounds in certain manufacturing processes.

  • Image of orcas

    CJEU: Coreper decisions are challengeable under Article 263 TFEU

    This case concerned a challenge by the Commission of a Coreper decision approving the submission of a reflection paper to the annual meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources.

  • picture of a meadow

    EU court: national authorities must disapply national rules that are contrary to EU law

    The Court of Justice of the EU confirmed that national bodies that apply EU law in the exercise of their powers must be able to disapply conflicting provisions of national law.

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    Court of Justice of the EU condemns French court for failing to make preliminary reference

    For the first time in infringement proceedings, the CJEU has ruled that a national court, the French Conseil d’Etat, breached EU law for not making a preliminary reference regarding the interpretation of EU law in accordance with Article 267 TFEU.