At ClientEarth, I have the chance to be part of a committed team that uses law in innovative ways to protect people and the environment. I am glad and proud that I can make a small contribution to the fight for more transparent and participatory decision-making and to guarantee effective legal remedies for everyone.
Sebastian Bechtel, Environmental Democracy Lawyer, ClientEarth

Sebastian Bechtel

Environmental Democracy Lawyer

Sebastian Bechtel joined ClientEarth in May 2018 as Environmental Democracy Lawyer.

Sebastian’s work focuses on the rights to access to information, public participation and access to justice as contained most prominently in the Aarhus Convention, an international binding treaty concluded by States of Europe and Central Asia. Before joining ClientEarth, he worked for the secretariat of the Aarhus Convention at the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

Previously, Sebastian has interned and worked for the European Environmental Bureau (EEB) and the Independent Institute for Environmental Issues (UfU). He has been a fellow of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide (ELAW) and of the Centre for International Sustainable Development Law (CISDL).

He holds a Bachelor in International and European Law (LL.B.) from the University of Groningen and a Master of Laws (LL.M.) from Cambridge University.

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