European Union archive

  • Wolf - CJEU rules on protection of Finnish wolves

    Finnish Wolves: Milestone ruling for EU wildlife protection

    Today Europe’s top court has upheld the strict protection that EU law offers to wolves and other species. The ruling is a key milestone in the protection of endangered Finnish wolves.

  • EU internal review mechanism: CJEU confirms broad principles on scope and standard of review

    The CJEU has confirmed the broad principles defined by the General Court on the scope and standard of its review in the context of the internal review procedure.

  • Nord Stream 2 and Access to justice in Sweden and Finland

    ClientEarth has seen the conclusion of two domestic proceedings with important implications for access to justice in environmental matters in Sweden and Finland.

  • Access to justice in environmental matters in Poland: what’s next?

    EU law also requires that the public and environmental NGOs have access to courts to challenge forest management plans. This was not the case in Poland.

  • Poland organises 5th training on Access to justice

    Employees of the Local Government Appeal Boards and Maritime Office took part in the fifth training organised within the framework of the “Access to justice for a Greener Europe” project. It took place on 17 September in Szczecin.

  • Belchatow coal plant in Europe

    Europe’s largest coal plant: five reasons to bring a lawsuit

    Read our five facts that illustrate why we’ve brought a case against Europe’s largest coal plant – Belchatow and demanding they stop burning coal by 2035.

  • Europe Coal Plant Belchatow

    We’re challenging Europe’s most climate-damaging power plant

    Today we launched a legal challenge against Europe’s largest power plant – Belchatow – and two of its mines to demand it stop burning lignite by 2035.

  • Webinar : “Challenging activities that harm the environment : article 9.2 of the Aarhus Convention”

    Our webinar “Challenging activities that harm the environment : article 9.2 of the Aarhus Convention ” is now available online!

  • dumpster

    Lawyers weigh in on human rights violations in Italy’s waste crisis

    ClientEarth have made a submission to the European Court of Human Rights in a case brought by Italian citizens against their government’s systematic failure to address environmental pollution.

  • Beijing Skyline

    Top China judges visit UK for environmental law training

    Twelve top Chinese judges recently visited the UK for training to help them implement China’s ambitious new environmental laws.

  • Wind turbines by the shore in the mist

    How to clean up dirty coal

    We are starting to win the fight on coal. Slowly, using law and campaigns and public pressure, we are seeing coal power stations close. Renewable energy is growing. And governments are finally promising to phase out filthy coal.

  • childs bike with road subsidence in Greece

    The cost of coal – Breaking Greece’s unlawful ties to fossil fuels

    For six decades, lignite – the dirtiest and once the cheapest form of coal – has been the driving force of Greece’s economy. Today, lignite has become inefficient and costly. It’s time to clean up coal.

  • IUU fishing is one of the greatest threats to marine biodiversity:

    Spain should continue to tackle illegal fishing – other EU member states must follow.

    ClientEarth legal experts have produced a briefing for European policy makers outlining the importance of imposing significant deterrent sanctions and penalties against citizens and organisations that have taken part in illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities.

  • Three beige towers of a power plant

    Major court win shows power of corporate law to fight climate change

    ClientEarth lawyers have scored a major win in Poland, which puts the future of planned coal plant Ostrołęka C in question.

  • European Commission building

    EU Commission announces environmental legal action: our response

    EU Commission announces environmental legal action. ClientEarth lawyers react.

  • Access to Justice update from ClientEarth and Justice & Environment

    Read about our latest analysis, project updates, and other tools available for you.

  • EU can better protect environment by strengthening corporate responsibility

    The EU can help tackle deforestation, environmental harm and human rights abuses by introducing mandatory due diligence – rules which require companies to identify and prevent the negative impact of their operations and supply chains.

  • New Aarhus draft findings: Life-time extensions of quarries require public participation

    On 3 July 2019, the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee published its draft findings regarding an Irish communication on a decision to extend a quarry permit by 5 years.

  • Court of Justice of the EU backs Brussels citizens’ right to clean air

    On 26 June 2019, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) held that citizens can challenge the lack of adequate air quality plans.

  • yellow bulb against blue sky

    Does Europe have a coal problem?

    Why is everyone so worried about coal, and is there a clean alternative? Europe has over 250 coal power stations, and is building more. Read on to find out why this is bad for the planet, and how we can stop dirty coal.

  • wood pile

    EUTR News – April to June 2019

    This issue of the EUTR News provides an update on the operation of the EU’s law to address illegal logging, from April to June 2019.

  • We call on European Commission to take legal action over huge number of whale and dolphin deaths

    Today, we have jointly called on the European Commission to take legal action against 15 EU governments for failing in their legal duty to protect whales, dolphins and porpoises in the North East Atlantic from capture in fishing nets.

  • Internal review procedure: the General Court places further restrictions on access to justice

    In an appeal against a Commission internal review decision, the General Court has set restrictive criteria regarding the arguments that can be raised before it to challenge the act subject to internal review.

  • The Hungarian Government retreated in a landmark issue

    The new law, which follows a dangerous trend of undermining the independence of judges also seen in Poland, has been postponed “for an indefinite time”.